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There’s always something to howl about

Business as Politics? No way.

I don’t know where I am on the political spectrum.  I don’t think it’s particularly important.  But I know that if I took Robert Worthington’s approach to my business, I would be out of a job.  People come to me with problems.  I try to help them resolve their problems within the set of rules.  They pay me.  End of story.

What I think about those rules when I lay my head down at night is quite distinct from how I earn a living.

Whether you’re a lawyer or a real estate agent, a lender or a widget maker, you add value to the world by solving other people’s problems: keeping them out of jail, finding them a home, helping them finance a purchase, or selling them some widgets.

How you conduct your business – how you treat people and honor your commitments – matters.

What you think about whether they take a tax credit, or borrowed from 2003-2006 at Fed subsidized mortgage rates, or have benefited for decades from the mortgage interest rate deduction does not matter.

And if you’re so concerned about an $8,000 tax credit that you’d turn away customers, I think, quite frankly, your priorities are confused.  There are some deep injustices in the world, and in this country.  An $8,000 giveaway, however stupid or smart a policy that may be, is not one of them.

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  • 5 comments

    5 Comments so far

    1. Eric Bramlett October 31st, 2009 4:53 pm

      Great post.

    2. Keith Lutz November 1st, 2009 6:59 am

      See that proves it, Lawyers are rated lower in the rankings of polls based on “Trustworthiness”! LOL

    3. Don Reedy November 1st, 2009 7:50 am

      Damon,

      Time for a gut check here.

      In you last post you talked about loving the newness that is coming of learning to be a salesperson, not just an attorney, and here’s a lesson you may want to at least consider.

      “Whether you’re a lawyer or a real estate agent, a lender or a widget maker, you add value to the world by solving other people’s problems: Whether you’re a lawyer or a real estate agent, a lender or a widget maker, you add value to the world by solving other people’s problems: keeping them out of jail, finding them a home, helping them finance a purchase, or selling them some widgets.

      Sorry, but can’t accept this at face value. I grew up in Youngstown, Ohio during the time when it was a Mafia run town (some say still today). The Mafia added value to a lot of lives by “… you add value to the world by solving other people’s problems: keeping them out of jail, finding them a home, helping them finance a purchase, or selling them some widgets.” That’s how the bad guys work. They look just good enough to fool you. They work just hard enough to make you believe them. They’re sales people….of the worst sort.

      Damon, How you Say What You Say is Important. Robert’s good to go, in my book, for having and expressing something other than what might be considered “best business practices.” It’s important, for instance, to discern that philosophy, especially if taken to introspectively, is valuable.

      All I’m asking is that you take a look at the fact that the $8000 tax credit can in fact be a great injustice when looked at through the eyes of a fellow citizen who cares as much about the injustice of a single act over the injustices of multiple acts. As an attorney, believe me, you’re going to live in that world for the rest of your life.

    4. James Boyer November 2nd, 2009 9:32 am

      So true, It is dumb to turn away business on such thin principle. Perhaps if the revised home buyer credit with the higher income limits will bring a few more home sales to this area where the old credit eliminated most people from being able to qualify.

    5. Dan Connolly November 2nd, 2009 12:02 pm

      Good post Damon! It’s nice finally to hear from someone who has a contrary opinion.

      I have wondered why we hear so much whining about the huge load this tax credit will have on our grandchildren when we spend more than what the tax credit will cost every six weeks in Iraq, and nobody seems concerned about that!