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iPad observation #5: Linking frees slaves, sometimes, but the future of mobile real estate is unknown to attorneys from New York City.

Here’s a true fact: I’m pretty much disgusted with the RE.net — which denomination I quarried with my own hands, back in my early days on the apellation trail. By now, just about everything looks to me like hoke, smoke, hustle and jive — smirking vendorsluts and the clueless suckers who can’t stop themselves from pridefully posturing about having procured their own plundering. I know that’s not fair — or not entirely fair — but it often seems to me, lately, that everything I have ever hated about the real estate business is successfully infesting the on-line world.

This will fail, all of it, in the end, and I’ll say why in detail when I get time. But for now I persevere by holding my nose and holding my ground. Whether it is the seemingly harmless simian chatter of net.monkeys desperate to prove their ape-titude to all the other net.monkeys or the craven schemes of hack vendors looking for just one more gullible fool to make their month, I’m well sick of it all. I haven’t looked at a feed-reader in many months, and my Twitterverse consists of my Best Beloved, Cathleen, and Teri Lussier.

The rest of the net, however, is a different thing. I’ve been following Apple tablet posts for months, and The Unofficial Apple Weblog is the only blog other than BloodhoundBlog whose client I have on my iPhone. On and off last week, and in greater earnest today, I’ve been looking for decent iPad posts from the RE.net.

Not hard to foresee, but Agent Shortbus doesn’t get it. Typically insipid kibitzing with no real understanding of the revolution the iPad will bring to the entire universe of commerce.

But, alas, the Shortbus set doesn’t have the vision to come up with a truly idiotic argument against using mobile devices to market real estate. This honor was earned by Rob Hahn, an attorney in New York City who doubles as a vendorslut consultant or a consultant to vendorsluts or some bizarre combination of the two. Realtors follow his musings religiously, apparently because they confuse being an attorney with being a Realtor, and living in New York City with living in a normal real estate market.

In any case, “The Inglorious R.O.B.” insists that smartphones won’t work for real estate marketing, first, because the cops might not like it, and, second, because he bought a lame-ass smartphone. As a matter of courtesy, in case you are laboring under the false impression that these arguments are not totally absurd, let’s dispense with them:

First, people obey anti-texting laws just about as religiously as they obey speeding laws. And, on the off chance that a cop is not tied up with a real crime or a bloody traffic accident, it seems likely that the uniformly-disobeyed law he is most likely to enforce — if he’s already topped off on donuts for the day, that is — would be the speed laws. If you’re not getting pulled over for speeding all the time, text away. Nobody cares — except for “The Ignominious R.O.B.”

Second, good smartphones have good batteries — and the iPad will have a great battery. I think trying to use a smartphone to shop for real estate in New York City would be beyond stupid, but, as it turns out, people in the rest of America not only have cars from which to illegally use their smartphones, they also have a smartphone charger plugged into the cigar lighter. As I have mentioned, my car has three cigar lighters, but I use two of them for 330 watt 120 volt power inverters, thus to power my own laptop and my clients’. The horror! Not just smartphone use on wheels, but actual flagrantly criminal laptoppery! There oughta be a law, dammit!

And surely I am being unfair to “The Ignorable R.O.B.,” but it’s sane to argue that “mobile won’t matter in 2010″ for one reason only: Because 2009 was the most important year for mobile real estate marketing. This is why we talked about it so much here last year. Even so, I’m prepared to argue that the iPad could still win the year — but with a more interesting kind of mobile real estate marketing.

And: To hell with all that. Let’s talk about people who are getting things right.

Here is a wonderful post from TechCruch, speculating about the iPad the day before it was announced. The author manages in a few paragraphs to document everything the Vook could have been if Brad Inman had the kind of respect for his customers that Apple has.

The online buying model for newspapers and magazines isn’t going to save the publishers, any more than iTunes Music and TV downloads have been saviors for their respective content owners. Will consumers benefit? Absolutely. But they won’t be willing to pay a premium for content they can access on the web for free. And if old media shifts to a pay-only model, consumers will just switch to free online alternatives. There will be exceptions — publishers with high quality, exclusive content (say, the New York Times) will likely benefit. But the majority of newspapers and magazines? Not so much.

But what about this promised land of revolutionary hybridized content — won’t people be willing to pay for that? Thing is, that’s going to be time consuming and expensive to make. A handful of very large publishers, like the NYT, may be able to scrap together some compelling content on a regular basis. But it’s going to be difficult to quickly integrate additional supplementary material in a way that doesn’t feel tacked on.

So Who Will Benefit?

Textbooks. Guides. Biographies. Novels. Pretty much anything that has previously been offered in book form, but has been handicapped because it was restricted to paper. Few of these have ever been ported to the web in a rich media form, because they’re lengthy and it just isn’t fun to read a book on your computer screen. And even when textbooks have been digitized (like for the Kindle DX), they didn’t bring anything new to the table. But there’s so much room for improvement.

Imagine a biography of Abraham Lincoln that allowed you to pull up photos of every person and place mentioned with a single finger swipe.  Flicking the top of the screen would bring down an interactive timeline of Lincoln’s life, making it easy to get your bearings. The hybrid book could include comprehensive references for each person mentioned in the book. Not just a Wikipedia article, mind you, but information that is contextually relevant to the moment you’re currently reading about. The experience wouldn’t simply be one of jumping from hyperlink to hyperlink. All of this supplementary material would naturally flow into the reading experience, while you never left your place in the primary text.

There are plenty of other potential applications. Picture a chemistry textbook where you could freely rotate any molecule, tapping on a chemical bond to learn more about why it behaves the way it does. Or a Shakespeare play (in text form) where you could tap a piece of dialog to hear it spoken aloud, or perhaps even played in a video. Tapping a sidebar at any time would bring up a roster of characters and their allegiances, lest a love triangle leave you confused.

There are infinitely more possibilities ready to be unlocked.  Many of these things could be done were this content converted to a rich webpage, but up until now there hasn’t been much benefit to doing so because there was no way to comfortably consume it.

Read it all. That’s your Deep Think homework for the day. Here are some lighter bits:

The PC officially died Wednesday. So says The New Republic, and of course I agree with this evaluation. It will take a few years, and the die-hards will surely die hard. But the die is cast.

Mashable insists that the great eBook war aas already begun. I’d say it’s already over, but, as the article hints, dinosaur forces could be brought to bear. More from me on the latter later.

The Photography for Real Estate blog raises an interesting point: If your real estate marketing is Flash-dependent (that would be in your virtual tours, etc.), you’ve got some thinking to do. Your photos already aren’t making it to the iPhone, and soon they won’t be making it to the iPad, either. (Just in passing: engenu uses Javascript, for two reasons: Flash don’t travel and Flash don’t search. Lo-tech don’t mean no-tech.)

And Geek Estate has a nice post on the iPad as a Realtor’s electronic amanuensis. I talked about some of this stuff on Wednesday, but Michael LaPeter came up with some ideas I missed. Like this:

Build a fun, interactive signup sheet for visitors. You could let them choose to subscribe to various value add lists right there, and depending on what you use it could put their info right in your list/ database, no tedious transcribing later.

That’s brilliant, as is this:

Take notes directly into your online CRM/ organization software, with no risk of losing them and no tedious transcribing later.

Ignoring “The Inexplicable R.O.B’s” inability to understand the immense and accumulating power of mobile technology as a real estate marketing tool, the iPad is the perfect replacement for the Realtor’s portfolio, that classy-looking notebook you’ve been carrying around so you can pretend to take notes. Now you can take notes — and keep them forever in your CRM database.

There’s more out there, I’m sure, but I haven’t seen it. If you’ve spotted a particularly valuable iPad post, weigh in with the link. As much as I enjoy spanking idiots, I’d much rather see people working hard to improve their understanding of the world.

Linking frees slaves — I love that joke — but only if the slaves want to be free. I do. How about you?

 
My early posts on the iPad:

Related posts:
  • Ten million iPads to be sold in 2010? It could happen…
  • iPad observation #3: If your baby — or a caveman — can figure out how to use the iPad, the user-interface works
  • iPad observation #6: “We are all in the gutter, but some of us are looking at the stars.”

  • 29 comments

    29 Comments so far

    1. Louis Cammarosano January 31st, 2010 5:16 pm

      It would seem that mobile is all but inevitable – that is once device makers address what many of the younger technorati are missing as essential for wide spread adoption-make the screens bigger.

      Use of mobile devices for advanced applications and viewing won’t be adopted by an aging squinting boomer population.

      The ipad seems to address the screen size issues.

    2. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 5:25 pm

      Oh, good grief, Louis! I agree with everything you said. Now what? ;)

      Just in passing, just so you know: I cite you often in discussions as a completely straight-forward, completely transparent vendor.

    3. Rob Hahn January 31st, 2010 5:47 pm

      Hey, thanks for your thoughts… as relatively incoherent as they may be. As I’m not real clear what you’re actually saying, let me limit myself to correcting factual errors.

      1. I am not an attorney.
      2. I don’t live in New York City.

      Having a JD and being a retired member of the NY Bar does not, as far as I know, make me “an attorney”. YMMV.

      What ebooks and newspapers and such have to do with consumers using their mobile phones to search for real estate is beyond me, but then again, I’m merely an attorney in New York City.

      And adding notes into your CRM is your basis for claiming the iPad will kill the PC? Oookay; I do hope you’ll back up your grand assertions by letting us know the day (in the next few weeks) when you’ve gone all-iPad-all-the-time.

      Finally, if you’re going to attack a position, it might help if you actually understood it: namely, that the CONSUMER is highly unlikely to be using mobile devices for the purpose of searching for real estate in the year 2010. You’re free to disagree, but at least understand the argument. Again, what consumer behavior has to do with agents having laptops in their cars, or using mobile for CRM, is beyond me — especially considering that I’m on record as having said that the future of mobile in real estate is in B2B, rather than B2C, barring technological breakthroughs.

      I know you’re a smart guy, Greg, and you do enjoy a good verbal joust. So you decided to latch on to one of my posts to make some point or another about how the iPad will change the world as we know it. That’s all fine and dandy but… when you fail reading comprehension in constructing your “argument”, it just makes you look bad.

      -rsh

      PS: I don’t know who Ben Yost is, but I do believe he’s stealing your content:

      http://benyosts1.com/coloradoloan/bloodhound-blog-ipad-observation-5-linking-free-slaves-sometimes-but-the-future-of-mobile-real-estate-is-unknown-to-attorneys-from-new-york-city

    4. Scott Cowan January 31st, 2010 5:51 pm

      Prior to my iPhone screen splintering into a spiderweb I always said my iPhone was a great device but a terrible phone. NOW I will have the device I was hoping for and without a terrible phone attached to it. The large format will make it a fantastic tool for anyone who has to share information with others.

      One of my reservations is the ability to survive a fall. I know that laptops do not drop well but my experience with my iPhone only falling 6 inches in my car and shattering has left me a bit gun shy….

    5. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 5:58 pm

      > the CONSUMER is highly unlikely to be using mobile devices for the purpose of searching for real estate in the year 2010.

      They already are, in huge numbers. The two supporting arguments from your post were absurd, but you don’t know what you’re talking about, anyway.

      I’ll give you this much credit: You have more guts than Brad Inman.

    6. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 6:02 pm

      > One of my reservations is the ability to survive a fall. I know that laptops do not drop well

      Interestingly, MacBooks use the accelerometer to determine when they’re falling, shutting down the hard disk on the way down.

      Meanwhile, Griffin makes some nice durable covers for the iPhone. Could be they’ll do the same for the iPad.

    7. Rob Hahn January 31st, 2010 6:48 pm

      >They already are, in huge numbers.

      Oh okay then, I’ll just take your word for it Greg.

      Or, I’ve got a better idea — not because you gotta prove anything to me, but because your readers might want to know that you know what you’re talking about.

      You’re using SmarterAgent; you must have data on consumer downloads, searches, leads, and escrows directly traceable to consumer usage of mobile apps. Share the data. Show your loyal readers what they’re missing out on if they’re not implementing mobile strategies right now.

      >but you don’t know what you’re talking about, anyway.

      Again, I’ll just take your word for it.

      -rsh

    8. Brian Brady January 31st, 2010 7:16 pm

      “the CONSUMER is highly unlikely to be using mobile devices for the purpose of searching for real estate in the year 2010.”

      http://forums.redfin.com/rf/board/message?board.id=SiteQuestions&thread.id=620&view=by_date_ascending&page=1

    9. Brian Brady January 31st, 2010 7:23 pm

      “the CONSUMER is highly unlikely to be using mobile devices for the purpose of searching for real estate in the year 2010.”

      http://www.zillow.com/blog/zillow-mobile-zestimates-to-go/2006/07/

      EVERY SINGLE ONE of the borrowers I met in the past 60 days, even the ones with four-year old mobile devices, knows the Zillow mobile site and relies on it when touring homes. ALL of the iPhone users had the Redfin app on their devices.

      I’d say it’s a West Coast thing but SmarterAgent is headquarted in Camden, NJ.

    10. [...] example, earlier today, Greg Swann of Bloodhound Blog (a national real estate blog) just laid it on yours truly: But, alas, the Shortbus set doesn’t have the vision to come up with a truly idiotic argument [...]

    11. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 7:47 pm

      > Show your loyal readers what they’re missing out on if they’re not implementing mobile strategies right now.

      The smart ones have already done it. The lazy ones never will. I made a similar point in an earlier post.

      > I’ll just take your word for it.

      Reality is apprehensible to the senses. It’s just a matter of seeing with your eyes and not your appetites or your prejudices.

    12. Teri Lussier January 31st, 2010 8:41 pm

      Brian-

      >I’d say it’s a West Coast thing but SmarterAgent is headquarted in Camden, NJ.

      Think how it’ll stop traffic in my little cornfield of the world.

      Rob-

      You were wrong about Gene Kelly and your batting average still stinks, but I for one, think you are rather glorious, so take that Greg Swann.

      Rob, you cannot put the mobile toothpaste back into the tube. Information wants to be free, that is uncontained, not chained, available when we want it to be available.

      I don’t know where you live, but imagine this- in small towns and suburbs across the country, people will have the opportunity to take a Sunday drive, or the long way home (I know you love music) and see a custom built, traffic stopping yard sign. ZOMG, honey, stop the car! There, they can sit in the warmth of their heated leather seats and text a thingy on their doohickies and BAM! like magic, who cares how it got there, information about the home, without having to make that embarrassing jog to the sign for the old, rotting, rain-soaked info-flyer.

      You don’t think people will take to this? Information at their finger tips, from the semi-privacy of their own cars, in their own phones?

      The iPhone has created a new market, even for people who don’t have an iPhone. People want information at their fingertips, without a computer, on their own terms. You can’t put that toothpaste back in the tube mostly because _we won’t let you_.

      Nice to see you over here, btw.

    13. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 8:47 pm

      > so take that Greg Swann.

      Certainly. Glad to.

      > There, they can sit in the warmth of their heated leather seats and text a thingy on their doohickies and BAM! like magic, who cares how it got there, information about the home, without having to make that embarrassing jog to the sign for the old, rotting, rain-soaked info-flyer.

      When I wrote about DriveBuy, Jessica Wynn Horton signed up at once in order to “go green” by doing away with fliers altogether.

    14. Teri Lussier January 31st, 2010 9:02 pm

      >Certainly. Glad to.

      Men from boys, folks.

      >doing away with fliers altogether.

      Exactly. It’s very simple- who wants to have one more piece of paper in their lives? I’m a tactile person, so I love paper, but I don’t want more of it, and it’s 8 degrees here right now. In 6 months summer heat will force Phoenicians to become vampires and stalk the night. No one wants to get out of the comfort of their cars.

      That’s what the iPhone, and now the iPad can do, and we will take it, and run with it, because that’s how we are wired. Technology is catching up to us, our true selves- we are information aggregators. That’s the history of mankind, we share information with each other.

    15. Louis Cammarosano January 31st, 2010 9:32 pm

      Currently, even for a cutting edge site like Zillow its probably highly likely that the vast majority of their millions of visits come NOT from mobile devices -yet.

      Many people (including home searchers) access web sites from their work computers – they don’t leave the office fire up their iphones and search homes (they do that to make personal phone calls).

      A quick survey of HomeGain’s visits does show an increasing number of mobile visitors including some from the droid, however, the overwhelming numbers of our millions of visitors a month come from non mobile sources.

      I do expect this to change and we will eventually release mobile apps.

      So is 2010 the year mobile breaks and hits the “tipping point”? Probably not, but its irrelevant whether its 2010 or 2011 or 2012. They day is coming.

    16. Teri Lussier January 31st, 2010 9:41 pm

      Louis-

      I think this could be a case of not enough promotion of mobile apps. You may be in a better position to address this than I, but if more agents used mobile apps in promoting property, and aggressively promoted those apps the way we do our websites, well, which would you rather use? I’m much prefer to use my phone, and it’s a bb.

      Give me mobility or give me death. :)

    17. Teri Lussier January 31st, 2010 9:48 pm

      >access web sites from their work computers – they don’t leave the office fire up their iphones and search homes (they do that to make personal phone calls).

      Actually, this is another reason to have mobile apps. If your phone is personal, your company can’t keep track of your time.

    18. Louis Cammarosano January 31st, 2010 10:01 pm

      Teri

      Interesing thought re whether agents should promote mobile technologies.

      I would think that the majority of agents would chose to address the safe market where the bulk of the consumers are.

      Trailblazing opportunist agents would encourage their consumers to follow them to better technologies.

      Often times, however, its not the first that get there that win the ultimate prize. The explorers often get taken out ahead of their time, while ‘laggards’ then capitalize on the roads paved by the trailblazers.

      Addressing the current market with an eye to the future is how I think a prudent business should position itself.

      Creating the future, while inspiring for idealists, is often costly and perhaps not a high percentage play.

      Now, if you have venture capital or someone else’s money…..

      “Actually, this is another reason to have mobile apps. If your phone is personal, your company can’t keep track of your time.”

      True but many employees, I would guess, do use their employers’ time to do personal business and perhaps would prefer to continue that practice.

    19. Teri Lussier January 31st, 2010 10:16 pm

      >Often times, however, its not the first that get there that win the ultimate prize. The explorers often get taken out ahead of their time, while ‘laggards’ then capitalize on the roads paved by the trailblazers.

      Blah blah, Louis. That’s loser talk, and beneath you. Truly innovative people never stop moving forward, you know that as well as I do.

      >True but many employees, I would guess, do use their employers’ time to do personal business and perhaps would prefer to continue that practice.

      Oh, they’ll still do it on someone else’s time, but not on the company computer, where the IT guy can see it.

      The phone is not a phone. We have to stop thinking of it as a device to make calls, and think of it as it is- a tiny little computer. Once you make that leap, really make that leap, then you want everything on your own personal pocket sized computer. Is the general public there yet? Probably not, and neither are companies, but Louis, think how far we’ve come with computers in such a short time. Once the technology is in place, it rockets forward faster than we imagined. It happened with the iphone, it’ll happen with the iPad.

      Once agents start pushing mobile apps, the consumers will too, and the app creators will advance to places I can’t imagine. It’ll be here quicker than we think.

    20. Greg Swann January 31st, 2010 10:40 pm

      Jumping in here in Teri’s support, without presuming to have followed everything:

      One of the things I would look for fairly soon in iTunes (the OS-X/Windows application) is an iPhone/iPad emulator. The link among computers is going to be through the apps — syncing data for apps is new in the iPad SDK — so why not let people use the apps they own on the desktop/laptop machine they sync from? Not that this matters. Mobile real estate apps are used from the car — and, as you note, at all hours.

    21. Rob Hahn January 31st, 2010 11:51 pm

      Hi Teri -

      Well, I think yer swell too, so there!

      Now, as far as this:

      >I don’t know where you live, but imagine this- in small towns and suburbs across the country, people will have the opportunity to take a Sunday drive, or the long way home (I know you love music) and see a custom built, traffic stopping yard sign. ZOMG, honey, stop the car! There, they can sit in the warmth of their heated leather seats and text a thingy on their doohickies and BAM! like magic, who cares how it got there, information about the home, without having to make that embarrassing jog to the sign for the old, rotting, rain-soaked info-flyer.

      >You don’t think people will take to this? Information at their finger tips, from the semi-privacy of their own cars, in their own phones?

      I think this is a case of pretty severe observer bias and wish-projection.

      Yes, I’m sure that the scenario you describe does happen. A couple who is in the market for a house, randomly driving around when they see a house for sale, who then pull over, and whip out their iPhone (or less likely, iPad given its form factor and size) and does a lookup/search. If they got “wanna buy a house” on their mind, then yeah, that could happen.

      I wonder what percentage of consumers fall into this behavior pattern in 2010. Yes, in the future when Mobile Is King, and Minority Report seems less like sci-fi than a documentary, that will be an everyday occurrence.

      You would do well to read what I wrote in my post again; I didn’t say mobile will NEVER be a big deal. I said, and I stand by, my view that mobile won’t be a big deal in 2010. For the reasons I’ve stated. Greg has failed to convince me otherwise; not that he was trying to convince me of all people, heh.

      For now, for today, for this year, I believe that consumers are more in the “on-off” mindset when it comes to housing. They’re either in the market for one reason or another, or they’re not. Most of the time, most people are not in the market to buy a new house. Therefore, they will ignore most consumer real-estate apps. If they are in the market, then they go through a fairly lengthy process starting with area selection, financial considerations, web-based searches, etc. and only get to the “let’s go mobile honey” phase somewhat later in the process.

      We’ll see; time will tell.

      FWIW, I don’t disagree with your notion that mobile is the future of computing; I just don’t think the future is now. Climb off the high-flowing rhetoric ladder and ask yourself this: what percentage of your customers in 2010 do you expect will come to you primarily from mobile? Allocate resources accordingly.

      -rsh

    22. Teri Lussier February 1st, 2010 5:45 am

      Rob-

      You say “high-flowing rhetoric” like it’s a bad thing. ;-)

      Let’s ask this: What percentage of clients come from sign calls? DriveBuy and SmarterAgent are simply signs that prompt action just like any traditional yard sign, but they reach a large and growing percentage of people who would prefer to get their information via text/mobile. You wouldn’t (and didn’t, I know) suggest we stop putting up yard signs.

      iPhone is a cell phone baby, relatively speaking and regardless of market share, it’s already pushed every other cell phone into a different place marketing-wise, and smartphones, application-wise. The iPad just did the same thing for all communication.

      FTR, the only Apple products I own are two 10+yo computers that are gathering dust in our storage unit, and a Shuffle, a gift, that has maybe 40 songs on it and I forget about until I get another iTunes gift card. I have no plans to purchase an iAnything, but, I understand that Apple changes other products and our lives. This is the year that our lives go mobile.

      It’s only January. I’ll check back with you in December and we can giggle about this conversation. That is, if you giggle… Okay, we’ll just laugh then.

    23. Louis Cammarosano February 1st, 2010 9:00 am

      “Blah blah, Louis. That’s loser talk, and beneath you. Truly innovative people never stop moving forward, you know that as well as I do.”

      Teri

      May i ask that you consider an analogy so that you may better appreciate my position?

      Innovation best succeeds with execution as its partner.

      Its mid 1997 and you own Teri’s Dayton Video Rentals- a profitable VHS rental firm. There is a Block buster 5 miles away.

      The Blockbuster five miles away does decent business but you more than hold your own with a knowledgeable staff and reasonable returns policy.

      Teri’s Dayton Video Rental shop has a cutting edge layout and is a shrine to marketing top hits and sub genres. Customer satisfaction and loyalty is high.

      You consider yourself an industry expert in video rental marketing, subscribe to all the trade magazines and attend a few conferences each year.

      The DVD has been around for about a year and you love it. You have a DVD player and so do most of your friends. DVDs are scarce and in your area no major outlet rents them so you buy the DVDs that you watch.

      Indeed in 1997 the DVD market is just 2% of video rentals.

      The industry predict that in 1998 10% of all videos rented will be DVDS and for explosive growth thereafter with market penetration reaching 40% in 2000.

      If there is one thing you are convinced of its that the DVD will replace the VHS.

      Blockbuster does not yet carry DVDs. What do you do?

      Some suggestions:

      1. You vow that by January 1998 you will purge all VHS rentals from your shelves and replace them with DVDs and rename your shop Dayton DVD’s. You will beat blockbuster to the punch and grab the attention in your town spurring on DVD player sales and DVD rentals.

      2. You learn all you can about the speed of adoption of the DVD and the DVD player. You research movie studios release plans, if available. You watch for what blockbuster might do. In short, you put your own experience aside (for now)and review the DVD market data closely. You set up a small DVD section in your store and display the few available titles prominently. You may even sell a couple of models of DVD players to attract the early adoptors.

      3. You do nothing with respect to DVDs except watch what blockbuster does. When and if they offer DVDs for rent, so will you.

    24. Teri Lussier February 1st, 2010 9:54 am

      Hi Louis-

      I do understand your position, and Rob’s position, and if I were either of you I’d be telling my clients the same thing you are saying. What else can you do?

      Quickly, I’m on my way out the door- The gift of being human as opposed to being simian is that we can communicate complex ideas and concepts over vast space and quickly. We are Information Conduits. Our ability to facilitate that ability pushes our civilization forward. We cannot not do this. We cannot cease to do this, it’s baked into our DNA cake. Recently, up until now, our ability to do that has been hampered by our ability to learn computer skills. The iPad just made it possible for people with no computer communication skills to communicate their own thoughts and ideas, pushing information to each other over phones, computers, TVs…

      Jump now or don’t, but this year changes everything.

    25. Teri Lussier February 1st, 2010 6:39 pm

      More on photography applications: http://aperture.maccreate.com/2010/01/29/ipad-the-best-photographic-portfolio-ever/

      Obviously, we will be sitting in a car previewing homes with this. Better get those photo skills up to snuff or hire it out.

    26. Karen Brewer February 1st, 2010 8:14 pm

      I find you to be an angry man,very angry—-all the time.I dont know whos right or wrong in this post but I can tell you that I find your ranting unbearable.I dont know how you havent done yourself in by now if you truly believe everything is DEAD DEAD DEAD, How depressing and untrue.
      I was told Bloodhound was a must read by my blog mentors but -Im out. Youre just too over the top.Not everything requires the force and vitriole you spew.Get a life or some real troubles and then maybe youll calm down,get some clarityand focus your energy toward something meaningful.

    27. Greg Swann February 1st, 2010 8:57 pm

      > I find you to be an angry man,very angry—-all the time.

      Karen, how does your reading comprehension measure up? There is nothing angry in that post. It starts with an expression of regret, proceeds to a few jokes, then ends with some practical links. I expect that telling the world that you don’t like my writing was in some sense therapeutic for you, but it’s hard to imagine whom you might hope to influence. In any case, we’ll dust off the electrons you’ve been using and pass them along to someone else. You will be welcomed back anytime.

    28. Joe Dallorso February 4th, 2010 6:33 am

      So Jobs points out that Flash doesn’t work with Mac OS. Isn’t that just another example of corporate arrogance? What percent of web traffic is Mac any way? In my case my blog stats say 7%. Shouldn’t Apple conform to the rest of the world rather than expecting the world to change for them?

      I think Louis Cammarosano’s comment above regarding the DVD scenario says it all. Can being too far ahead of the curve be a waste of time & money?

    29. Greg Swann February 4th, 2010 7:08 am

      > Shouldn’t Apple conform to the rest of the world rather than expecting the world to change for them?

      Like the man said, “That’s what makes horse races.”