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There’s always something to howl about

What happens in an internet minute? And how do you hope to push-market your way through it?

My take: You cannot successfully push-market into that cacophony. You must pull, because there is already way too much push. I’m thinking Eric Blackwell’s archives warrant your attention.

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  • 12 comments

    12 Comments so far

    1. Jeff Brown April 28th, 2012 12:47 pm

      Just read a description of push marketing, using blogs as an example. Are blogs push marketing? It’s confusing as hell.

    2. Greg Swann April 28th, 2012 1:25 pm

      > Are blogs push marketing?

      A blog itself is push-marketing (“Here, take my business card!”), but the consumer searching for your services on Google is pull-marketing (“How can I get your business card?”). Pushing business cards into a hurricane of data will offer diminishing returns, going forward, but strategically-focused weblog content will enable potential clients to find you.

      The TwitBook mafia sees a billion users without noting that people TwitBook to talk, not to listen. If you want to talk to those folks, these are the magic words to listen for: “Hey, can I ask you a question?” Until you get to that inquiry or one like it, you’re shouting into a gale-force wind.

    3. Peter Jordan April 28th, 2012 3:52 pm

      Instead of pushing, we need to be asking permission by offering incentives (e.g contests, special offers, coupons) so our advertising is accepted voluntarily.

    4. Joshua Dorkin April 28th, 2012 4:57 pm

      Greg – Do you see blogs as a dying medium, then? Certainly we’ve seen countless blogs come and go through the years, but many have sustained a strong following and continue to grow and thrive.

      What’s your take? Thanks for the share.

    5. Greg Swann April 28th, 2012 5:46 pm

      > Instead of pushing, we need to be asking permission by offering incentives (e.g contests, special offers, coupons) so our advertising is accepted voluntarily.

      That’s really just more push. An inquiry you don’t have to buy in one way or another comes in over the transom, completely unsolicited.

    6. Greg Swann April 28th, 2012 5:51 pm

      > Do you see blogs as a dying medium, then?

      No, I don’t think so. Blogs die because the creators lose interest, but if a blog is either a thriving community, like your place, or a valuable information resource, there is no reason it should not persist. If something replaces search engines as the source of focus-able traffic, things could change. But as long as people are searching, sites that answer questions people want answers to should be fine.

    7. Jeff Brown April 28th, 2012 6:02 pm

      Speaking only for my own blog, Greg, that’s how inquiries come in to me. My big ‘push’ is limited to phone number and a ‘Contact BawldGuy’ button.

    8. Greg Swann April 28th, 2012 6:28 pm

      > Speaking only for my own blog, Greg, that’s how inquiries come in to me. My big ‘push’ is limited to phone number and a ‘Contact BawldGuy’ button.

      That’s all you need. Years of laser-focused content bring them in from Google, what they find is what they were looking for and an easy way of making contact ties ‘em up with a bow. You could shout for attention all day and get none. But have the answer on hand to the question the prospect is asking and they will come to you pre-sold, yours to lose.

      I was saying this same stuff four years ago at BloodhoundBlog Unchained in Phoenix.

      The exemption I would make to the general argument is also yours, BTW — comment marketing. When you can insert yourself in an on-going conversation in a way that says “I’m your guy” — that’s a push that can pull.

    9. Joshua Dorkin April 28th, 2012 6:55 pm

      > as long as people are searching, sites that answer questions people want answers to should be fine.

      Agreed.

      >comment marketing. When you can insert yourself in an on-going conversation in a way that says “I’m your guy” — that’s a push that can pull.

      Unfortunately, Greg, most just get the comment marketing wrong. They add little of value and fail to extend the conversation — two of the things that are required to be successful in that medium.

      That all said, I wonder if you measured the “most successful” push vs pull techniques, which would end up on top. I suppose it all depends on the site/product, though…

    10. Greg Swann April 28th, 2012 9:05 pm

      > Unfortunately, Greg, most just get the comment marketing wrong.

      That’s why I praised Jeff. He’s a master at making connections with choice comments.

    11. Alyssa King April 28th, 2012 10:14 pm

      Great image, Greg. It’s really fascinating. And I agree about the blogs. I think that they can stay alive and healthy if the content is right and the following is consistent (such as this blog). But I think the number of active blogs will decrease as they are seen as an internet fad of the past for those who once blogged more regularly. Similar to how Myspace or Ebay lost their traction because because they were no longer new and exciting- I think some blogging will go the same way.

    12. Debbie Gartner May 28th, 2012 11:36 am

      Interesting conclusion. I guess this helps support my blogging strategy. I’ve placed the control in the customer’s hands and when they are ready, they will find me and call me.